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Losing Eden: Our Fundamental Need for the Natural World and Its Ability to Heal Body and Soul

Losing Eden: Our Fundamental Need for the Natural World and Its Ability to Heal Body and Soul - Lucy Jones

Losing Eden: Our Fundamental Need for the Natural World and Its Ability to Heal Body and Soul


In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explains why human beings have a powerful and fundamental need--mental, spiritual, and physical--for the natural world, the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"Fascinating. The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding

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In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explains why human beings have a powerful and fundamental need--mental, spiritual, and physical--for the natural world, the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"Fascinating. The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
In Losing Eden, Lucy Jones explores why human beings have a powerful, fundamental need--mental, spiritual and physical--for the natural world. She explores the profound impact this has on our consciousness and shows how nature has the ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart. And she reveals as well the newest, cutting-edge scientific evidence that proves nature as nurturer.

Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how this aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose. She writes of how she came to see--stumbled upon--the need for the natural world in the same way that she needed drugs and alcohol.

In reconnecting with nature, Jones realized that she never felt lonely or alone in the world outdoors, that there she belonged to the broader community of species and beings and to the complex matrix of life itself. She writes of how she became aware that the essence of nature--the geometry of it, the repeating patterns of shapes of ferns, seashells, lightning, salt flats, snowflakes, ocean waves and clouds, all varying with scale, as well as the scents, sounds, colors and textures of the wild--has life-changing powers, and that natural shapes affect the human brain.

Jones examines the intersection of science, wellness and the environment, and she reveals that in the last decade scientists had begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods or an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses to nature: the lowering of cortisol that is released in response to stress, the boost in cortical attention control that helps us concentrate and subdues mental fatigue and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that slows the heart and allows the body to rest.

Weaving memoir, scientific investigation, interviews and history into a broad-ranging ecological portrait, Jones illuminates what makes nature so potent and why--and what all of this means for us and for our future.
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding
A fascinating look at why human beings have a powerful mental, spiritual, and physical need for the natural world--and the profound impact this has on our consciousness and ability to heal the soul and bring solace to the heart, and the cutting-edge scientific evidence proving nature as nurturer.

"The connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep--which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful." --Bill McKibben

Lucy Jones interweaves her deeply personal story of recovery from addiction and depression with that of discovering the natural world and how it aided and enlivened her progress, giving her a renewed sense of belonging and purpose.

Jones writes of the intersection of science, wellness, and the environment, and reveals that in the last decade, scientists have begun to formulate theories of why people feel better after a walk in the woods and an experience with the natural world. She describes the recent data that supports evidence of biological and neurological responses: the lowering of cortisol (released in response to stress), the boost in cortical attention control that helps us to concentrate and subdues mental fatigue, and the increase in activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart and allowing the body to rest.

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched. An elegy to the healing power of nature. A convincing plea for a wilder, richer world." --Isabella Tree, author of Wilding

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