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Skyward Inn

Skyward Inn - Aliya Whiteley

Skyward Inn


"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

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"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine?

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles?

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
"Rarely has a writer who is not Philip K. Dick had so much fun building a world only to take it apart." -- LA Times

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

"Whiteley's trademark subtle surrealism shines." -- Publishers Weekly

"Intense and consuming writing, constantly challenging expectations." -- Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of Children of Time

"A story of the future that is an appeal to the present. The best kind of science fiction. A novel of its time, confronting current and terrible misjudgements with which humanity assures its own demise. All made startling by a typical Whiteley strangeness." -- Adam Nevill, author of The Reddening & Wyrd and Other Dereliction

"Visceral and unsettling - I loved it" -- G. V. Anderson, award-winning speculative fiction author

"The absolute best kind of philosophical SF, & indisputable inheritor of Le Guin. Aliya Whiteley forces us to confront difficult ideas, but they are important, and will become even more so. Exactly what SF should do." -- Marion Womack, author of The Golden Key

"Whiteley is] one of the most original and provocative voices in contemporary science fiction." -- Nina Allen, author of The Rift

"Clever and touching: a book of cosmic scope but with real characters and a human heart." -- Chris Beckett, author of the award-winning Dark Eden series

"A powerful and surprising examination of colonialism and its unintended consequences. Highly recommended." -- Helen Marshall, author of The Migration

"Whiteley has a penchant for describing the disturbing... a surreal and disquieting post-apocalyptic consideration of the roles we place ourselves in." -- Barnes and Noble SF&F Blog

"Skyward Inn is an experience. Whiteley is a strong voice in speculative fiction and readers will be delighted and unsettled by her novels for years to come." -- The Nerd Daily

"Whiteley takes the reader on a cryptic journey of trust, identity and knowing your place in the world." -- Starburst Magazine

"A moving and thought provoking tale, completely unlike anything I've read before." -- The Bibliophile Chronicles

"There are some books that are simply beautiful. And Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley is one of those." -- Libri Draconis

"A melancholy and compellingly weird tale of identity in crisis." -- SFX

"A vital contribution to modern speculative fiction and a novel to be read and reread and pondered at length." -- The Fantasy Hive

"Skyward Inn feels like an instant classic of the genre." -- The Guardian

"A beautifully realised story, with achingly engaging prose." -- The British Fantasy Society

"Whiteley explores questions of identification, attachment and belonging, tying everything together in a wonderfully surreal and weirdly uplifting denouement." -- The FT
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.
A thoughtful, literary novel about conflict, identity and community, after Earth makes contact with the seemingly harmless planet Qita.

Drink down the brew and dream of a better Earth.

Skyward Inn, within the high walls of the Western Protectorate, is a place of safety, where people come together to tell stories of the time before the war with Qita.

But safety from what? Qita surrendered without complaint when Earth invaded; Innkeepers Jem and Isley, veterans from either side, have regrets but few scars.

Their peace is disturbed when a visitor known to Isley comes to the Inn asking for help, bringing reminders of an unnerving past and triggering an uncertain future.

Did humanity really win the war?

This is Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber, a beautiful story of belonging, identity and regret.

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