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The Business of Botanicals: Exploring the Healing Promise of Plant Medicines in a Global Industry

The Business of Botanicals: Exploring the Healing Promise of Plant Medicines in a Global Industry - Ann Armbrecht

The Business of Botanicals: Exploring the Healing Promise of Plant Medicines in a Global Industry


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.

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From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

"So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture."--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

"For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people." --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.


From tulsi to turmeric, echinacea to elderberry, medicinal herbs are big business--but do they deliver on their healing promise--to those who consume them, those who provide them, and the natural world?

"An eye-opener. . . . [Armbrecht] challenges ideas of what medicine can be, and how business practices can corrupt, and expand, our notions of plant-based healing."--The Boston Globe

So deeply honest, sincere, heartful, questioning, and brilliant. . . . [The Business of Botanicals] is an amazing book, that plunges in, and takes a deepening look at those places where people don't often venture.--Rosemary Gladstar, author of Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs

For those who loved Braiding Sweetgrass, this book is a perfect opportunity to go deeper into understanding the complex and co-evolutionary journey of plants and people. --Angela McElwee, former president and CEO of Gaia Herbs

Using herbal medicines to heal the body is an ancient practice, but in the twenty-first century, it is also a worldwide industry. Yet most consumers know very little about where those herbs come from and how they are processed into the many products that fill store shelves. In The Business of Botanicals, author Ann Armbrecht follows their journey from seed to shelf, revealing the inner workings of a complicated industry, and raises questions about the ethical and ecological issues of mass production of medicines derived from these healing plants, many of which are imperiled in the wild.

This is the first book to explore the interconnected web of the global herb industry and its many stakeholders, and is an invaluable resource for conscious consumers who want to better understand the social and environmental impacts of the products they buy.

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