headerdesktop trgr02dec22

MAI SUNT 00:00:00:00

MAI SUNT

X

headermobile cupontrgr06dec22

MAI SUNT 00:00:00:00

MAI SUNT

X

Promotii popup img

Cupon -20% la ORICE!

TRANSPORT GRATUIT la orice comanda peste 50 lei

siii CADOU

Comanda acum!
Close

In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America

In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America - Kabria Baumgartner

In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America


Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles-from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights-not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2021 AERA Division F New Scholar's Book Award

Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2021 AERA Division F New Scholar's Book Award

Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.

Citeste mai mult

-10%

transport gratuit

PRP: 254.83 Lei

!

Acesta este Pretul Recomandat de Producator. Pretul de vanzare al produsului este afisat mai jos.

229.35Lei

229.35Lei

254.83 Lei

Livrare in 2-4 saptamani

Descrierea produsului


Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles-from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights-not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2021 AERA Division F New Scholar's Book Award

Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.


Winner, 2021 AERA Division F New Scholar's Book Award

Winner, 2020 Mary Kelley Book Prize, given by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

Winner, 2020 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society

Uncovers the hidden role of girls and women in the desegregation of American education

The story of school desegregation in the United States often begins in the mid-twentieth-century South. Drawing on archival sources and genealogical records, Kabria Baumgartner uncovers the story's origins in the nineteenth-century Northeast and identifies a previously overlooked group of activists: African American girls and women.

In their quest for education, African American girls and women faced numerous obstacles--from threats and harassment to violence. For them, education was a daring undertaking that put them in harm's way. Yet bold and brave young women such as Sarah Harris, Sarah Parker Remond, Rosetta Morrison, Susan Paul, and Sarah Mapps Douglass persisted.

In Pursuit of Knowledge argues that African American girls and women strategized, organized, wrote, and protested for equal school rights--not just for themselves, but for all. Their activism gave rise to a new vision of womanhood: the purposeful woman, who was learned, active, resilient, and forward-thinking. Moreover, these young women set in motion equal-school-rights victories at the local and state level, and laid the groundwork for further action to democratize schools in twentieth-century America. In this thought-provoking book, Baumgartner demonstrates that the confluence of race and gender has shaped the long history of school desegregation in the United States right up to the present.

Citeste mai mult

De pe acelasi raft

De acelasi autor

Parerea ta e inspiratie pentru comunitatea Libris!

Noi suntem despre carti, si la fel este si

Newsletter-ul nostru.

Aboneaza-te la vestile literare si primesti un cupon de -10% pentru viitoarea ta comanda!

*Reducerea aplicata prin cupon nu se cumuleaza, ci se aplica reducerea cea mai mare.

Ma abonez image one
Ma abonez image one